Økonomiske sitat: 25-26 september 2008

Lagret under: krise-sitater, økonomisk on september 27, 2008 at 3:51 pm

“The term ‘government money’ has been bandied about a lot in recent weeks. It is being portrayed as a near miraculous elixir that provides wonderful results when used for bailouts past, present and future. But government money comes with limitations. It is not a magic potion, and cannot cure all the ills of the financial system. More importantly, it is not even money at all – it’s debt.” 

James Turk, 25. September 

“The IMF — where Paul Wolfowitz went after carrying out his assignment at the Pentagon — is the Rothschild instrument to enforce its interests. They are auditing the Fed to make sure that no policy and no action of the Fed or the US government will result in any repudiation of debt owed to the Rothshild’s or in any way reduce the expected harvest of assets that the international bankers are expecting from the US collapse.  The IMF and the Federal Reserve should both be shown the door by the next president. The Federal Reserve needs to be shut down immediately — but by the United States, not by international financiers.”  

Dick Eastman 

“The measure includes a provision in which the public debt is raised to over $11 trillion. This will put it at about 85% of US GDP. We recall from a couple weeks ago that Louis 16th lost his head after France’s debt rose to about 80% of GDP. The problem is, when you get to that level of debt, lenders balk and the borrower runs room to maneuver. In the modern world, that probably means higher interest rates…and what was once unthinkable, a downgrade of America’s debt rating from AAA to something less than that – and possibly junk. 

This would be accompanied by a sell-off in the dollar too. In this regard, here comes an insight from the democratically elected president of Iran: 

“The world,” explained Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, “no longer has the capacity to absorb fake U.S. dollars.”  

Of course, that is exactly what we’re about to find out. Mr. Ahmadinejad has rushed to judgment. We’ll let the court take its time. But we have a feeling that the Iranian president is right about the ultimate verdict.” 

Bill Bonner, 25. September 

“When everybody thinks the same thing, no one is thinking. And now, everyone thinks the market screwed up…and the bureaucrats rush in to unscrew things.” 

“And what a bunch of numbskulls – Greenspan, Paulson and Bernanke! Every word they’ve said so far has been financial poison. “Greenspan relaxed about house prices…” reported the Financial Times in 2005. “Most negatives in housing are probably behind us…” said the same sage in October 2006. “We believe the effect of the troubles in the subprime sector…will be likely limited…” said Bernanke in March 2007. It’s “not a serious problem…I think it’s going to be largely contained,” added Paulson in April 2007.” 

“For the last 15 years, the U.S. money supply has grown about twice as fast as GDP. Federal government liabilities, meanwhile, have grown three times as fast. As a result, the USA now has more financial obligations than assets. It is, effectively, broke. Nevertheless, the debit side of its ledgers grow heavier and heavier. This year’s US government deficit will add about half a trillion. The US trade deficit is about $700 billion. The U.S. bailout plan will probably cost at least $1 trillion more.” 

“If, on the other hand, it merely prints the money – or if it creates it “out of thin air,” to use Lord Keynes’ handy phrase – the results are even worse. Inflating the money supply with new currency, a la Argentina or Zimbabwe, wipes out debts. But it destroys faith in the dollar and brings down the whole world’s money system. 

Sooner or later, this is just what will probably happen. Not because capitalism doesn’t work – but because it does. Capitalism is doing just what it should do – it is separating fools from their money. But the fools vote. After a big bubble, there are more fools than sages…and, in the United States of America, more debtors than creditors. Sooner or later, Americans will realize that they are better off destroying their own money than preserving it…and that they would prefer to stiff their creditors rather than pay their bills. That is when deflation will gives way to inflation…and the world’s post-’71 dollar-based money system comes to an end. ”

Bill Bonner, 26. September

“We’ve dedicated many columns and thousands of words to identifying what we feel are sound investments in fundamentally solid, debt-free companies, resource stocks and, of course, we constantly hammer home the importance of holding at least some of your wealth in physical gold.” 

Joel Bowman,  26. September 

“What’s left of the Barry Goldwater wing of the Republican Party, which maintains its natural tendency to trust the markets and not government, has dug in its heels. But, Bush, Paulson and the Democrats have argued that our problems are so dire that free enterprise principles must go out the window. The struggle is historic, but the Congressmen are fighting a losing battle. Sadly, Americans now appear willing to abandon their economic heritage at the first sting of financial pain.” 

“The urgency for passing this bailout bill is based on the claim that the American economy will collapse if nothing is done. If the government were to stay out, and allow the market to function, there will certainly be a great deal of economic pain. Companies will go bankrupt, banks will fail, real estate and stock prices will keep falling, and many people will lose their jobs. However, government action will not prevent any of this. At best, it will merely delay the inevitable, but only at the cost of increasing the severity of the underlying problems, thus making their ultimate resolution that much more painful to endure.” 

“Our leaders maintain that without this bailout consumers will not be able to borrow money to buy cars. So what is wrong with that? We already have plenty of cars, and if we are broke, why do we need to buy more? Instead, we need drive our old cars longer, pay off our underwater auto loans, and produce more cars for export. It is also argued that without access to credit parents will not be able to borrow money to send their kids to school. That’s fine by me as it will force Universities to reduce tuitions to levels families can actually afford. They will either have to cut out all of that bureaucratic fat, or go out of business for lack of customers.” 

Peter Schiff, 26. September 

“The financial meltdown the economists of the Austrian School predicted has arrived.” 

“We are told that “low interest rates” led to excessive borrowing, but we are not told how these low interest rates came about. They were a deliberate policy of the Federal Reserve. As always, artificially low interest rates distort the market.” 

“Speaking about Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the president said: “Because these companies were chartered by Congress, many believed they were guaranteed by the federal government. This allowed them to borrow enormous sums of money, fuel the market for questionable investments, and put our financial system at risk.” 

Doesn’t that prove the foolishness of chartering Fannie and Freddie in the first place? Doesn’t that suggest that maybe, just maybe, government may have contributed to this mess? And of course, by bailing out Fannie and Freddie, hasn’t the federal government shown that the “many” who “believed they were guaranteed by the federal government” were in fact correct?” 

“F.A. Hayek won the Nobel Prize for showing how central banks’ manipulation of interest rates creates the boom-bust cycle with which we are sadly familiar. In 1932, in the depths of the Great Depression, he described the foolish policies being pursued in his day – and which are being proposed, just as destructively, in our own: 

“Instead of furthering the inevitable liquidation of the maladjustments brought about by the boom during the last three years, all conceivable means have been used to prevent that readjustment from taking place; and one of these means, which has been repeatedly tried though without success, from the earliest to the most recent stages of depression, has been this deliberate policy of credit expansion.” 

The only thing we learn from history, I am afraid, is that we do not learn from history.”

“The very people who have spent the past several years assuring us that the economy is fundamentally sound, and who themselves foolishly cheered the extension of all these novel kinds of mortgages, are the ones who now claim to be the experts who will restore prosperity! Just how spectacularly wrong, how utterly without a clue, does someone have to be before his expert status is called into question?

Oh, and did you notice that the bailout is now being called a “rescue plan”? I guess “bailout” wasn’t sitting too well with the American people.”

Ron Paul, 26. September  


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